Details

Renovatio


Renovatio

Martin Luther's Augustinian Theology of Sin, Grace and Holiness
Refo500 Academic Studies (R5AS) 1. Auflage 2019

von: Phil Anderas, Günther Wassilowsky, Siegrid Westphal, Herman J. Selderhuis, Christopher B. Brown, Günter Frank, Bruce Gordon, Barbara Mahlmann-Bauer, Tarald Rasmussen, Violet Soen, Tóth Zsombor

74,99 €

Verlag: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht Verlag
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 17.06.2019
ISBN/EAN: 9783647593777
Sprache: englisch
Anzahl Seiten: 344

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Beschreibungen

Much mainstream Luther scholarship (and Lutheran theology) holds that Martin Luther downplayed, denied, derided, or just plain ignored “the holiness without which no one shall see the Lord” (Heb. 12:14). Phil Anderas advances a revisionist thesis: from the first inklings of his “Augustinian turn” c. 1514 to his death in 1546, Luther held and taught a robust theology of progressive renewal in holiness, carefully calibrated to the sober reality of residual sin and the astonishing gospel of grace in Jesus Christ. As it is set forth in the works that embody Luther’s most considered judgments (c. 1535-46), this gospel-centered and irreducibly trinitarian dogmatics of real renewal in holiness is “Augustinian” and “evangelical” in equal parts. As such, it commands the regard of theologians who stand in the tradition of the Church’s doctor gratiae. The argument proceeds in three steps: first, an exposition of the mature Luther’s dogmatics of sin, grace, and holiness; second, an investigation of the roots of this dogmatics in the theology of the “420s Augustine,” with whom a younger Luther was busily engaged c. 1514-16; third, an account of the continuities and discontinuities that characterize the development of Luther’s theology from its embryonic state in the mid-1510s through the breakthroughs of the 1518-21 period to the settled position of the old Doctor.
Once he broke through to his Reformation theology of justification sola fide, did Martin Luther really care about sanctification?
Martin Luther is not often regarded as a theologian of holiness. “Be a sinner and sin boldly,” after all – and leave sanctification for the Catholics, the Orthodox, the Finns, and the Reformed. On the basis of painstaking work in the sources, Phil Anderas’ Renovatio advances a revisionist thesis: from the first inklings of his “Augustinian turn” c. 1514 to his death in 1546, Luther held a robust theology of renewal in holiness, carefully calibrated to the sober reality of residual sin and the astonishing gospel of grace in Jesus Christ. This irreducibly trinitarian dogmatics of sin, grace, and holiness is “Augustinian” and “evangelical” in equal parts, and as such commands the regard of theologians in the tradition of the Church’s doctor gratiae.
Church historians, Theologians, Scholars of Early Modern History and Reformation Studies.

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