Cover Page

Contents

Cover

Praise for Case Studies in Multicultural Counseling and Therapy

Title Page

Copyright

Foreword

Introduction: Moving From Theory to Practice in Multicultural Counseling

DEVELOPING REAL-LIFE DIVERSE CASES

EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES

CHAPTER OUTLINE

INTEGRATING CULTURAL FORMULATION INTO ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT PLANS

REFERENCES

About the Editors

About the Contributors

Part I: Case Studies With U.S. Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations

Chapter 1: Clinical Applications With African Americans

AND STILL I RISE: THE STORY OF NIA

REFERENCES

REDEFINED: THE STORY OF ANDRE

REFERENCES

Chapter 2: Clinical Applications With American Indians and Alaska Natives

TREATING “DEPRESSION” IN A DYING NATIVE RELATIVE: THE STORY OF WILL

TREATING “DEPRESSION” IN A DEEPLY BEREAVED AND TRAUMATIZED CLIENT: THE STORY OF MARY

REFERENCE

Chapter 3: Clinical Applications With Asian Americans

FIGHTING CHANCE: THE STORY OF DONNA

INTERGENERATIONAL EFFECTS OF WAR: THE STORY OF WADE

Chapter 4: Clinical Applications With Latina/o Americans

MARGARET CAN'T DO IT ALL (BY HERSELF) ANYMORE

MULTIPLE ROLES, MULTIPLE IDENTITIES: THE STORY OF ELISANDRO

Chapter 5: Clinical Applications With Individuals of Middle Eastern and Northern African Descent

HARNESSING FEARS DURING A MEDICAL EMERGENCY: THE STORY OF JACOB M.

SILENCED: THE STORIES OF DALIA AND NABILA

Chapter 6: Clinical Applications With Individuals of Multiracial Descent

“YOU JUST DON'T GET ME!”: THE STORY OF ANITA

“I CAN MAKE IT ON MY OWN”: THE STORY OF DAVID J.

Chapter 7: Clinical Applications of a White Therapist Working With People of Color

TWO WORLDS: THE STORY OF MARCOS

MY WAR PARENTS FOUND MY GAY BOX: THE STORY OF BENJAMIN

REFERENCES

Part II: Case Studies Involving Special Circumstances With Ethnic Populations

Chapter 8: Clinical Applications With American Jews

L'DOR V'DOR, OR FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION: THE STORY OF SCOTT

THE “OTHER” IN US: THE STORY OF GABRIELLA

Chapter 9: Clinical Applications With Immigrants

NEGOTIATING CULTURAL CHANGE AND IDENTITY: THE STORY OF NADIA

LOSS AND POLITICAL EXILE: THE STORY OF PAUL

REFERENCES

Chapter 10: Clinical Applications With Refugees

FLEEING RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION: THE STORY OF LARISSA

AFTERMATH OF TRAFFICKING: THE STORY OF KAMALA

Part III: Case Studies With Other Multicultural Populations

Chapter 11: Clinical Applications With Women

LIVING IN THE SHADOWS: THE STORY OF MONIQUE

I'M A MOTHER FIRST! THE STORY OF SIMONE

Chapter 12: Clinical Applications With Men

MULTIPLE STORIES OF HENRY

REFERENCE

WHY AM I HERE? THE STORY OF MARTIN

Chapter 13: Clinical Applications With Transgender Individuals

JUST A “PHASE”? THE STORY OF LESLIE

AN INCOMPLETE EXPERIENCE: THE STORY OF ALICE

REFERENCE

Chapter 14: Clinical Applications in Sexual Orientation

NO HOME IN THE WORLD: THE STORY OF TONY

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: THE STORY OF BETH

Chapter 15: Clinical Applications With People in Poverty

THE WHITE PICKET FENCE LIFE: THE STORY OF MARISOL

REFERENCES

DO YOU HAVE EYES TO SEE ME? THE STORY OF MICHELLE

Chapter 16: Clinical Applications With Persons With Disabilities

WHY DIDN'T YOU TELL ME YOU WERE IN A WHEELCHAIR? THE STORY OF JOLEEN

THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH YOU A JOB CANNOT FIX: THE STORY OF GEORGE

Chapter 17: Clinical Applications With Older Adults

THE CHALLENGES OF CAREGIVING: THE STORY OF SARAH

I'M NOT CRAZY: THE STORY OF MR. CHANG

Author Index

Subject Index

Praise for Case Studies in Multicultural Counseling and Therapy

Translating theory into practice is a challenge for every school of clinical orientation. This casebook has succeeded by focusing upon elements of process in multicultural counseling and therapy to give us a rich resource of conceptual and practical aids to assist the teacher, trainee, and practitioner in making a stepwise transition from cultural knowledge to practice competencies.

Anderson J. Franklin, Ph.D., Honorable David S.
Nelson Professor of Psychology and Education, Boston College
Lynch School of Education

Anchored in our latest knowledge and research regarding cross-cultural counseling and spanning the whole spectrum of diversity, this collection of multicultural case studies serves as a wonderful companion to Sue and Sue's Counseling the Culturally Diverse and fills a gap for rich and contextualized cases illustrating the complex tapestry of our clients' lives.

Frederick T.L. Leong, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology
and Psychiatry; Director of the Consortium for
Multicultural Psychology Research

Case Studies in Multicultural Counseling and Therapy offers a rich narrative of therapeutic engagement with diverse clients highlighting the complexities of intersecting dimensions of culture. Such emotionally-gripping cases facilitate a soul penetrating capacity for expanding cultural schema and increasing cultural empathy among mental health professionals and trainees.

Michael Mobley, Ph.D., Associate Professor,
Salem State University

Having taught Multicultural Counseling for more than 10 years, Derald Wing Sue, Miguel Gallardo, and Helen Neville have finally answered students' most oft-repeated question, “How do I apply this knowledge to my clinical practice?” Based on real life cases, contributors offer a practical guide for students and instructors alike who are committed to enhancing multicultural competence. This is a must-have resource for every current and future mental health professional!

Lisa B. Spanierman, Ph.D., Associate Professor,
McGill University

Title Page

Foreword

The challenge of achieving congruence between the conceptual templates theorists develop and the practical strategies that result from the application of those constructs and principles to counseling and therapy, is a difficult one indeed. Yet, it is precisely this challenge that must be mastered if clinicians hope to find a broader utility for the ideas they develop that extend beyond the traditional or virtual library bookshelves. Derald Wing Sue, Miguel Gallardo and Helen Neville have mastered this challenging task, and their latest contribution, as a free standing text or an accompaniment to the hugely successful Counseling The Culturally Diverse: Theory and Practice (Sue & Sue, 2013), is a magnificent resource that will help create a greater bridge of understanding between the academic, research, and applied domains of the mental health professions.

What this text does so beautifully is bridge the gap between aspiration and actualization; between what a clinician strives to do and what he or she is able to deliver within the midst of a therapeutic encounter. And, it does so with a cultural flavor that is easy to follow, interpret, and understand, taking into account the complexities that reside where various elements of culture (race, ethnicity, age, gender, physical ability, sexual orientation, and religion) intersect and sometimes collide. For in my mind, that is the essence of congruence and that is what this text at its core represents.

These case studies provide a window into the heart of a challenging circumstance. Unlike raw theory, case studies provide a context for situations clinicians confront. Using elements like history, personal background, elements of culture that must be attended to, and an outline of other strategies that might have been employed prior to the pending intervention, they help to inform and shape the narratives of theoretical relevance. That is the space that is so critical, where clinicians decide what measure of convergence and divergence to employ when anchoring their intervention in the core principles of a theory and/or research.

Upon first glance, creating bridges of understanding between theory and practice seems like a simple enough task, and yet, if it were that routine, I suspect that the profession would be ripe with clinicians who were all masters at their craft. We would have no concern about misdiagnosis or mistreatment. There would be less talk about cultural competence and incompetence. And more importantly, the broader public who rely on professional counselors, psychologists, psychiatrists, clinical social workers, and therapists would be better served by those who desire to render quality care, but for whatever reason, fall short of their own as well as client expectations.

Decades ago, as a young graduate student, I recall studying the works and theories of those who were considered the “giants” in the field, including Freud, Jung, Adler, Skinner, Horney, Perls, Ellis, and Rogers. As each theorist outlined their set of constructs and principles, they helped to create a conceptual template that informed each of our practice with an intellectual roadmap that detailed elements of counseling and therapy, like the nature of humanity, the etiology of client distress, how and why people changed as a function of interventions from that theory's perspective, and in most cases, the role of the clinician/therapist in addressing whatever debilitation a client was struggling with. For many clinicians, however, the intellectual understanding of the theory was less of a challenge than the ability to operationalize that set of constructs into therapeutic practice. This was analogous to what Carl Rogers described as the difference between the “real” self and the “ideal” self, and it was that gap that created the most profound sense of incongruence clinicians and lay public alike struggled with.

Compounding the dilemma of achieving maximum congruence was the fact that so many of the theories were anchored in assumptions that were conspicuous by their degree of cultural sterility, particularly when it came to people of color, women, and others whose uniqueness was rarely, if ever, accounted for within the confines of a particular theory or orientation. As a consequence, there was an intellectual explosion of sorts where psychologists and counselors of African, Asian, Native American/Indian, Latina/o, and other descents contributed scholarship that both critiqued traditional mainstream approaches, and also outlined their own cultural variations of how a particular theory should be manifest within the context of work with a particular demographic group. Additionally, and quite possibly more relevant to many communities of color, are the contributions of scholars who advocate for moving beyond simply modifying existing mainstream theories, but also creating new paradigms that draw upon indigenous healing practices. And yet, even with that progress and some very profound and meaningful contributions to theory, there was still a gap between those constructs and how a professional helper could apply those ideas in work with particular populations.

In celebrating this welcome addition to the profession, and inviting all of you to take a serious look at the content within, we also owe a special thanks to the editors and their team of collaborators. This volume of multi-perspective case studies invites the reader to be a consummate risk taker. In this regard, these chapters invite you to be a mental risk taker, daring to stretch your thinking in ways that expose greater possibilities. The chapters invite verbal risks, where each of you will be challenged to break the silence of your own personal silos and discuss these case studies with colleagues and co-workers. These narratives invite you to take behavioral risks, if you dare to step outside of your personal comfort zones to try a different intervention you learned about through reading this volume.

We as professionals are committed to serving the students we teach, the clients we treat, and researching the questions that provide meaningful answers that inform our work. However, we also need the best tools and strategies that assist us in becoming more competent and proficient in our approaches. This volume on Case Studies in Multicultural Counseling and Therapy is a tremendous asset to your repertoire, and I for one would strongly encourage you take full advantage of all of this rich content and information.

Thomas A. Parham, Ph.D

University of California Irvine

Distinguished Psychologist

Association of Black Psychologists.

* NOTE: Scenarios help frame issues and provide context that allow for the application of theory in addressing a particular situation and circumstance.